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Radon 1

Indoor air quality can also affect your health.

There are many sources of indoor air pollution in any home. These include combustion sources such as oil, gas, kerosene, coal, wood and tobacco products; building materials and furnishings; products for household cleaning and maintenance, personal care or hobbies; central heating and cooling systems and humidification devices; and outdoor sources such as radon and pesticides.

For example, you can't see, smell or taste radon, but it is a gas that is harmful to your health. Radon can be found in buildings, such as homes, offices and schools. One way radon can get into buildings is by cracks in the basement, and if the ventilation is not good enough, radon levels can be harmful. Visit our section on Radon to learn more.

To learn more about other sources of indoor air pollution, visit the Environmental Protection Agency's website.